The Jacksons

Washington Jackson died of pneumonia at Town Thorns during a very cold spell on 20 February 1895. He is buried in the cemetery in Brinklow. Constance was left a widow with two young children. She and the boys were the principal legatees to his Will. The total estate was £67082 in excess of £4 million today. She sold the property in 1902  and returned to the South of England. Two years later she married the Rev Richard de Verdon Williams who added the name Jackson to his own. They settled in Spestir Grange, Bow, Devon. Raymond attended Blundells School where he participated in the Officer Training Corps. Both boys went to Sandhurst. Bertram served in the King’s Rifle Corps. Raymond became a Major in the Royal Fusiliers. He lived for a time at Henley-on-Thames, subsequently became Chairman of Easthampstead RDC and a JP for Berkshire in 1936. He was married and had two sons. The elder was killed in Normandy. The younger son, Peter was born in 1925. Raymond died in 1967 aged 73 years.

Bertram’s birth certificate issued in Rugby is something of an enigma. His birth date is shown as 26 February 1889, but 18 years later on 10 July 1907, his mother made a statutory declaration to the effect that his birth took place seven days earlier on 19 February 1889.

The character of the man Washington Jackson is revealed in his obituary notice. He was devoted to his home, his wife and his family. Reserved by nature, he did not take an active part in public life, but he supported worthy causes making generous subscriptions to the clothing and coal clubs in aid of his poorer neighbours in Easenhall. Jackson was highly respected and esteemed by his fellow magistrates, and was noted for his compassion. For, if there was any doubt, he leaned in favour of the defendant. Other terms used were amiable, courteous, kindly, cultured, a kind and considerate employer. His sporting interests included riding to hounds and shooting.

The funeral was held on Monday 25 February. Constance was not well, so she did not attend. Washington Jackson had expressed a wish that the occasion be as plain and unimposing as possible. His wishes were observed. No flowers were placed on the grave.

H Bromwich of Rugby, Funeral Directors, made all the arrangements. The coffin was of polished oak with brass fittings. The hearses of the day were glass-sided, and drawn by black horses with black ostrich feather plumes on their heads. Carriages followed the hearse; the first two carried the family members, then the servants at Town Thorns. An impressive list of the local gentry is listed in the procession. Mr E H Wood of Newbold Revel, Capt R J Beech of Brandon Hall, Mr P Muntz, MP from Dunsmore, Mrs Lister Kaye, of The Manor House, Stretton-on-Dunsmore, Mr C Wilcox of Wolston Manor, Mr J P Cross from Catthorpe Towers, Mr T N Graham of Brookside, Rugby, Colonel Caldecott of Holbrook Grange. Already present at the Church were Mr R Lant from Nailcote Hall, Mr J Wheatley of Berkswell Hall, Mr Petre of Whitley Abbey Senior Magistrate, Coventry Bench, Colonel Woolcombe Adams of Anstey Hall, Mr and Mrs Cooper, Hillmorton Paddox etc.

Many of the inhabitants of Brinklow drew down the window blinds as the cortege passed through the village to the church. The rectors of Brinklow and Monks Kirby officiated. The pallbearers were eight of the estate employees. The coffin was lowered into a grave, the rim of which was lined with evergreens. At seven o’clock that evening a muffled peal of bells was rung at Brinklow Church.

GOD IS LOVE

IN BELOVED MEMORY OF

WASHINGTON JACKSON

OF TOWN THORNS

WHO DIED FEBRUARY 20TH 1895 AGED 70 YEARS

LIFE’S RACE WELL RUN

LIFE’S WORK WELL DONE

LIFE’S CROWN WELL WON

NOW COMETH REST

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